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6 Reasons Why Roses Are Wilting After Transplant

Whether you’re transplanting your rose because you need to erect a new structure in that area or have bought the rose from a neighbor, it is essential to take good care of it.

Before transplanting your rose, you have to ensure that everything is in order, and the conditions are favorable.

Failure to do so, your rose will face many problems such as wilting or even die.

Rose is Wilting After Transplant

Rose wilting is common in transplanted roses, but it can be overcome.

Some of the causes of wilting in roses are transplant shock, under watering, overwatering, adverse weather conditions, feeding the rose fertilizer very early, pests, and much more.

In this post, we’re going to guide you on what to do if you discover that your rose is wilting after transplanting it. So, brace yourself and let’s get started!

Transplant Shock

One of the major causes of wilting in transplanted roses is transplant shock. This is a common thing in not only roses but as well as other plants.

The leading cause of transplant shock is transplanting the rose at the wrong time.

The best time to transplant the plant is during late winter or early spring when it is dormant.

Therefore, if you transplant the rose during the high growing season, there is a high chance that it will undergo transplant shock.

How To Fix It

Nevertheless, you can fix transplant shock in many ways. The first way is by pruning back all canes to reduce stress for your plant.

Secondly, you will have to water the rose excessively after transplanting it.

Roses need water most of the time, and you may have to water more if it’s in shock.

This doesn’t mean that the soil should be waterlogged, as it can cause problems as well.

Ensure it is well-drained. Another way to alleviate the rose from transplant shock is by moving to a shady area to recover and reintroduce to the sunlight slowly.

Lack Of Water

Another reason why your rose might wilt after transplanting is because of a lack of water or excessive water.

After you’ve transplanted your rose, you need to water it frequently but with the right amount of water.

Never overwater or underwater your rose as it will cause it to wilt. Water is vital for the transportation of nutrients in the plant.

So, without it, your plants will wilt or even dry and die.

On the same note, excessive water will be dangerous to your plant as it will deprive it of oxygen and even lead to diseases.

How To Fix It

It is simple: make sure you water your roses with the right amounts of water. Do this regularly until you see new growth. However, you should ensure that the soil is well-drained.

Soil Conditions

Before transplanting your plant, ensure that you’re transplanting the rose in rich soil. Besides, the soil should be well-drained and the right type.

Transplanting your rose in waterlogged soil will only suffocate the plant instead of supporting it.

When there is excess water in the soil, the plant will not take up oxygen.

And as a result, the roots will cease functioning, which will also affect the leaves and cause the plant to wilt.

On the other hand, dry soil will lose water quickly, which will also suffocate your transplanted rose.

How To Fix It

Check the pH and nutrient level of the soil before transplanting. This will help you to add the required fertilizer for proper growth of the plant.

However, you should avoid using fertilizer and instead, use mulch or compost in the hole that you want to transplant the rose.

Furthermore, inspect the soil and make sure it has the right temperature for the transplanted rose to thrive.

Some soils may be too hot or too cold for your rose transplant, which may cause wilting and suffocation.

Adding Fertilizer Too Early

A common mistake that many gardeners make when transplanting their roses is adding fertilizer to the just transplanted plant.

Even though adding fertilizer in small quantities can be beneficial, it’s better to wait than risk and endanger your plant.

This is because fertilizer can be excess, which may cause the rose to wilt.

Fertilizer gets into the roots in a water solution through osmosis.

This can work positively if the concentration is lower or work opposite if the concentration is high.

If it works opposite, then it will suck water out of the roots and cause your plant to wilt.

How To Fix It

The most straightforward remedy for this condition is to wait until your plant shows the first growth.

So, don’t add any fertilizer to a transplanted rose. It doesn’t matter whether it is small or excess fertilizer, you should not apply it at all.

Diseases

After transplanting your rose, you should closely monitor it as it can be an easier target for diseases.

Many plant diseases in the soil can enter the rose through the roots and prevent water from reaching the leaves.

As a result, the leaves might droop or sag. So, you should keep a watch on several fungi that leave in soil.

How To Fix It

If you realize that there are fungi or any other disease in the soil, you can treat the rose using a fungicide. But if the plant is severely infected, then you will have to get rid of it.

Pests

Pests are one of the gardener’s nightmares. Aphids and termites can attack your plant at any time without your knowledge. These usually suck juices from the leaves your rose and cause them to wilt.

How To Fix It

If the infestation is small, you can remove it using hands. But if they are many, you can use a mild insecticide soap.

Final Thoughts

If you don’t want your rose to wilt after transplanting, ensure that you follow the right steps before transplanting it.

As we’ve explained above, do the right things, and you will have nothing to worry about.

Transplant the rose at the right time, provide adequate water, ensure that the temperatures are right, the soil should be nutrient-rich, don’t fertilize early, prune the canes, and monitor the plant for diseases and pests.

If you do all of these things, then your rose will thrive, even after transplanting it.